Tips & Tricks: MS Word
First, A Little Bit of History!
Word has been around for the better part of two decades now, and it has gone through many different versions and permutations. Relative newcomers to the wonderful world of Word can easily become confused when discussing Word versions, so in order to clarify any misunderstanding, the following information is offered.
·                   Word 2 was available on the market in the early 1990s. It was used and abused by millions.
·                   Word versions 3, 4 & 5 followed quickly and were all successive updates for the DOS environment.
·                   Word 6 was released in 1993. There were actually four different versions of Word 6 that you may hear reference to: Word 6.0, 6.0a, 6.0c, and Word NT, version 6.0. The version for Windows NT was actually released in 1994.
·                   Word 95 was released in 1995. This is often referred to as Word 7. (Word 95 and Word 7 are one and the same.)
·                   Word 97 was released in November 1996. This version is also known as Word 8.
·                   Word 2000 was released in June 1999. This version is sometimes referred to as Word 9.
·                   Word 2002 was released in August 2001. This version is sometimes referred to as Word 10. (Sometimes the version is incorrectly referred to as Word XP. There is no Word XP, but Word 2002 is included in the Office XP suite.)
·                   Word 2003 was released in October 2003. This version is sometimes referred to as Word 11.
·                   Word 2007 was released in January 2007. This version (can you guess?) is sometimes referred to as Word 12.
·                   The most recent incarnation has been as part of Office 2010 in June this year, and, because of the aversion to the number 13, is also known as Word 14.
There were numerous differences between each of these versions, and some versions had multiple service packs released for them, which meant there were even more differences. There are also versions of Word released for other platforms, such as the Mac, and they go by even different names. Among the versions noted above, the biggest differences from one version to another were with the introduction of Word 97 and Word 2007. Word 97 changed many interface features, the file formats used by Word, and the programming language used for macros. Word 2007 introduced an even more radical change in the user interface along with another new file format, but no drastic changes in the programming language for macros.
Finding Word 2007 Equivalents
The user interface in Word 2007 is dramatically different than in previous versions of Word. This means that it can be difficult to locate all the commands that you previously knew how to find. This tip provides information on a helpful Excel workbook that details where to find the old Word 2003 commands in Word 2007which you can use to help with the transition to Word 2007.
You can find the workbook at this URL:
http://office.microsoft.com/search/redir.aspx?AssetID=AM101938681033&CTT=5&Origin=HA100625841033
Download the workbook to your system, and then open it. You'll find a worksheet tab for each of the Word 2003 menus and toolbars, and each worksheet contains a list of the old commands from that menu or toolbar. To the right of these commands you'll find the way to accomplish the same task in Word 2007.
The workbook can be opened either in Excel 2003 or Excel 2007.
Some Keyboard Shortcuts:
Arranging Paragraphs
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
Sometimes you want to move a paragraph or two around in your document. For instance, you might want to move a paragraph from its current location to before the preceding paragraph. You can quickly move paragraphs by following these steps:
Position the insertion point in the paragraph you want to move.
While holding down the Shift and Alt keys, press the Up Arrow or Down Arrow to move the paragraph.
Deleting Words
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
While editing documents, it is not uncommon to delete words, phrases, and the like. Different people take different approaches to the task. For instance, some people just select the text and press Delete, while others may simply hold down the Delete or Backspace keys until the unwanted characters disappear.
If you are in the latter group, and you spend a lot of time pressing Delete or Backspace, you may be interested in a handy shortcut provided by Word. All you need to do is hold down the Ctrl key to speed up your deletions. Using Ctrl+Delete deletes text from the insertion point to the end of the next word. For instance, if you wanted to delete four words to the right, simply press Ctrl+Delete four times. Likewise, Ctrl+Backspace deletes words to the left of the insertion point.
An interesting use of these shortcut keys is to speed up editing tasks, not just mass deletions. For instance, let's say you wanted to change the word "sidestep" to "sideways." Normally you would find some way to simply delete "step" and type "ways." This could involve pressing Delete or Backspace four times to get rid of the unwanted portion of the word. You can make your edit faster if you just position the insertion point at the beginning of "step," press Ctrl+Delete once, and then type "ways."
Understanding Underlines
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
There are several different types of underlines you can use in Word. Underlining is handled from the Font dialog box. (Select Font from the Format menu, or in Word 2002 onwards Ctrl+D.) The dialog box allows you to select from a variety of underline types. The following are the major types available:
Underline Type
Meaning
None
Removes any underlining from the selected text
Single
Adds a single underline, the entire length of the selected text
Words Only
Underlines only the words (not spaces or tabs) in the selected text
Double
Adds a double-line underline, the entire length of the selected text
Dots
Same as Single, but uses a line of dots instead
Dashes
Same as Dots, but uses dashes instead of dots
The actual types of underlines available, and how those types are presented in the dialog box, depend on your version of Word. For instance, Word 2003 and Word 2007 both offer 18 different options of underlines. Most of these options offer variations on the Single, Dots, and Dashes options mentioned above.
Applying the All Caps Format
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
Word provides a formatting option to show text as uppercase, even when it is not. You apply this option by choosing the All Caps check box on the Font dialog box. (In Word 2007 press Ctrl+D. In earlier versions of Word choose Tools | Font.) This formatting feature is helpful if you have a selection you want to print as all uppercase, but you may well decide to convert it back to normal upper and lowercase text later.
If you use this formatting feature quite a bit, it can get bothersome to continually pull up the Font dialog box and click on the All Caps check box. A faster way is to simply select the text you want to affect and then press Ctrl+Shift+A.
Entering a Page Break from the Keyboard
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
Page breaks are Word's method of signalling that the following text should begin at the top of a new page. You probably know that you can insert a page break by choosing Break from the Page menu. However, this involves removing your hands from the keyboard and using the mouse, which can disrupt the pace at which you are typing.
The quickest way to enter a page break using the keyboard is to simply press Ctrl+Enter. Word dutifully adds the page break and you can continue typing away.
Messed-up Typing
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
If you are a new Word user, you may have noticed that there are many ways you can mess up your document using Word. This comment isn't meant to be flippant or disparaging. The truth of the matter is that Word provides quite a bit of editing power. Along with that power goes the ability to mess up a document if the powerful tools are not used correctly.
A very simple example may be in order. Let's say you are typing along, and you look at your document. You notice that some text you previously entered is gone, and each character you type seems to also delete a character. What is going on?
If this happens to you, stop for just a moment. Take a look at the status bar at the bottom of the Word document window. If you see the letters OVR in bold type on the status bar, the problem is that you have inadvertently hit the Insert key as you were typing. When you do, Word enters a special editing mode known as "overtype mode" (that's what the OVR characters stand for). While in overtype mode, everything you type replaces something else in your document. For instance, when you type a letter, it replaces the letter to the right of the insertion point. When overtype mode is not active, your text is inserted where the insertion point is located.
To undo your messed-up document, first turn off overtype mode by pressing the Insert key again. (The OVR characters on the status bar should no longer be bold.) Then, press Ctrl+Z to undo your last edit. You can continue to press Ctrl+Z until all the characters you inadvertently overtyped are again within your document. Now you can go ahead and continue typing without overtyping your original text.
Inserting a Copyright Mark
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
There are a number of special symbols that are often used in the course of creating a document. One common symbol is the copyright mark, which is a small letter C surrounded by a circle. Copyright marks are easy to add to your document, assuming you are using a version of Word that has AutoCorrect and that it hasn't been turned off or modified. If this is the case, you should be able to type a lowercase C surrounded by parentheses-as in (c)-and Word will automatically change the three characters to a copyright mark.
If you have AutoCorrect turned off, there are a number of other ways you can insert a copyright mark. If you use the keyboard a lot, you can simply press Ctrl+Alt+C. If you prefer to use the mouse, you can follow these steps:
Display the Symbol dialog box by displaying the Insert tab of the ribbon, clicking Symbol, and then More Symbols (Word 2007) or choosing Symbol from the Insert menu (older versions of Word).
Click on the Special Characters tab. (Click here to see a related figure.)
Choose Copyright from the list of available characters.  Click on OK.
Quickly decrease/increase Point Size
(works with Microsoft Word 6, Word 95, Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, and Word 2003.)
Word provides a way to quickly decrease/increase the point size of a selection. To do this, follow these steps:
Select the text whose point size you want to decrease/increase.
Press Ctrl+[. (Ctrl+] to increase)
Every time you press Ctrl+[ (or Ctrl+] to increase), the point size of the selection will change by one point. If you want more precise control over the point size (for instance, making something 11.5 points), you must use the Font dialog box by choosing Font from the Format menu.
Quickly Displaying the Font Dialog Box
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
If you want to quickly format some characters in your document, try this trick:
Select the characters you want to format.
Right-click on the selected characters. A Context menu appears.
Select Font from the Context menu. Word displays the Font tab of the Font dialog box appears. (Click here to see a related figure.)
Format your characters.
Click on OK.
Using Extend Mode
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
One of the most overlooked shortcut keys in Word has to be the extend key. Yet, learning how to use this simple key can save your hours in your editing efforts. Here's how to use extend mode to make your editing more productive.
If you press on the F8 key, you enable what Word refers to as extend mode. This is the keyboard method of anchoring the cursor in preparation for making a selection. When you move the cursor using the cursor control keys, the size of the text selection changes and, if you are using a version of Word prior to Word 2007, the letters EXT appear on the status bar. You turn off the extend mode by pressing the Esc key.
One of the handy things to do in extend mode is to search for other text. For instance, let's say you wanted to select everything between the current cursor position and the next occurrence of the word "echo." All you need to do is turn on extend mode (press F8) and then search for "echo." Word selects everything between the two points.
When you press the F8 key multiple times, you can select different parts of your text. For instance, when you press F8 once, you simply turn on extend mode. Press it a second time, and the current word is selected. A third time results in the current sentence being selected. A fourth time selects the current paragraph, and a fifth time selects the whole document.
A Few Tips on Using the Mouse:
Selecting a Word
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
If you are using a mouse, Word provides a shortcut to select an entire word. To do this, follow these two steps:
Using the mouse pointer, point to the word you want to select.
Double-click on the mouse.
If you want to select additional words, hold down the mouse button after the second click and drag the mouse across them. Word adds one word at a time to your selection.
If you want to select the whole paragraph treble-click the mouse.
Once the words are selected, you can do any other editing function on those words.
Copying Paragraph Formatting with the Mouse (Format Painter)
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, and Word 2003.)
Often it is beneficial to copy paragraph formatting from one place in your document to another. Word provides a quick way you can do this by using the mouse:
Select the paragraph whose formatting you want to copy.
Click on the Format Painter tool on the toolbar.
Using the mouse, select the paragraph you want formatted.
You can also copy the same format repeatedly by double clicking the Format Painter tool in step 2. You will then be able to apply the same formatting until you turn off format painting by clicking on the tool one more time, or by pressing Esc.
Moving Text Using the Mouse
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
Word incorporates many different tools you can use to edit your document. Perhaps one of the least used, but most unique methods of editing your document uses the mouse entirely. You can use your mouse to move text, the same way you would move another element, such as a graphic. To move text with your mouse, you need to first ensure that the feature is enabled. To do this, follow these steps if you are using Word 2007:
Click the Office button and then click Word Options. Word displays the Word Options dialog box.
At the left side of the dialog box click Advanced.
Make sure the check box beside the Allow Text to Be Dragged and Dropped option is selected. (The option is in the Editing section.)
Click OK to close the dialog box.
If you are using an older version of Word, follow these steps:
Choose Options from the Tools menu. Word displays the Options dialog box.
Click on the Edit tab. (Click here to see a related figure.)
Make sure the check box beside the Drag and Drop Text Editing option is selected.
Click on OK to close the Options dialog box.
Once enabled, you can use the mouse to move text by following these steps:
Select the text you want to move.
Click on the text with the mouse and drag it to where you want it moved.
Release the mouse button.
If you want to simply copy your text (instead of actually moving it) you can hold down the Ctrl key while using the mouse to drag the selection.
Nifty Zooming With the Mouse
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
If you zoom in and out of your documents quite a bit, you may get tired of using the pull-down zoom control on the toolbar. If you have a mouse that has the wheel between the two buttons, you can do a neat trick. All you need to do is hold down the Ctrl key as you turn the small wheel. Each click of the wheel, up or down, increases or decreases the zoom factor by 10%.                                        
Miscellaneous:
Using the Function Key Display Toolbar
(works with Microsoft Word 2000, Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
One of the hidden features of Word is a handy toolbar that lets you know what's what on the function keys. This is officially known as the Function Key Display Toolbar.
You can display this toolbar, in Word 2000, 2002, or 2003 by the following:
Choose Customize from the Tools menu. Word displays the Customize dialog box.
Make sure the Toolbars tab is selected.
In the list of available toolbars, select the Function Key Display toolbar. There should be a check mark next to the toolbar, and it should appear at the bottom of the screen.
Click on Close to make the dialog box disappear. The toolbar should remain.
Notice that the toolbar occupies only a single line at the bottom of your screen. It would be more helpful if you detached the toolbar into its own dialog box. Simply use the mouse to grab the vertical bar at the left side of the toolbar, and then drag it up and away from the bottom of the window.
Note that when you press some modifier key (Ctrl, Alt, or Shift), the keys shown in the Function Key Display toolbar all change. This makes the toolbar a great help in learning how to use the function keys.
Word 2007 has done away with toolbars and, as might be expected, with the Function Key Display toolbar. Instead, users of Word 2007 can see what various function keys do by simply pressing the Alt key. When you do, Word displays small letters over the options available through the ribbon. This allows you to easily see what key you should type next in order to initiate a particular command or display a particular ribbon option.
Getting Rid of Blue Squiggly Underlines
(works with Microsoft Word 2002, Word 2003, and Word 2007.)
In an effort to make your writing better, Word uses "squiggly" underlines to mark things it thinks you may need to change. If you see some blue squiggly underlines on your screen, you may wonder what they are for and how tot get rid of them.
Word likes squiggly underlines-the most common being red (a potential spelling error) and green (a potential grammar error). The latest squiggly underline introduced in Word is blue, which marks formatting inconsistencies (first introduced in Word 2002.) That is why you see the options you do-particularly "Replace Direct Formatting with Style Normal"-when you right-click the underlined word or phrase.
You can turn off this marking by making a configuration change in Word. If you are using a version prior to Word 2007, follow these steps:
Choose Options from the Tools menu. Word displays the Options dialog box.
Make sure the Edit tab is displayed. (Click here to see a related figure.)
Clear the Mark Formatting Inconsistencies check box.
Click OK.
If you are using Word 2007 the steps are slightly different:
Click the Office button and then click Word Options. Word displays the Word Options dialog box.
Click Advanced at the left side of the dialog box.
In the Editing Options section, clear the Mark Formatting Inconsistencies check box.
Click OK.
Notification when Caps Lock is Active
(works with Microsoft Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, and Word 2003.)
You're typing along, look up at your screen, and notice that everything is in ALL CAPS. Drat! You activated the Caps Lock key without knowing it, and now you have to correct your typing. Wouldn't it be great if there was a way you could be notified when the Caps Lock key was turned on? Well, there is……………..
You can use the accessibility features of Windows to audibly notify you when you've pressed the Caps Lock key. Follow these steps:
Display the Control Panel.
Double-click the Accessibility Options applet. The Accessibility Options dialog box opens.
Make sure the Keyboard tab is displayed.
Choose the Use ToggleKeys check box.
Display the General tab.
Make sure the ‘Turn Off Accessibility Features After Idle’ check box is not selected.
Click OK.
Close the Control Panel.
The ToggleKeys feature, when turned on, will beep whenever the Caps Lock, Num Lock, or Scroll Lock keys are pressed.
Inserting an Em Dash
(works with Microsoft Word 6, Word 95, Word 97, Word 2000, Word 2002, and Word 2003.)
Beginning with Word 95, you can insert an em dash (a long dash) by simply typing two dashes in a row. Word would sense this as you finished the word following the dashes, and then replace them with the em dash. If you have this capability turned off, however, you may be wondering how to get an em dash in your document. There are three ways you can do this, each of which works in all versions of Word:
Press CTRL+ALT+MINUS (on the numeric keypad)
Hold down the ALT key as you type 0151 on the numeric keypad.
Choose Symbol from the Insert menu, and then select Em Dash from the Special Characters tab.
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Some of the Questions and Answers we covered:
I sometimes lose my toolbar. How do I get it back?
View - toolbars
How do I insert Photographs or clip art into a word Document?
Insert - picture: clip art or file, choose picture.  Manoeuvre using the text wrapping icon (the dog) on the drawing toolbar, and choose "tight".  Choose "behind text" for something like a sunset.
Sometimes as I type I delete text to the right of the cursor. How can I correct this?
You've hit the "Insert" (or "Ins") key on the keyboard.  Using this will overwrite text.  You'll see the letters "OVR" lit at the bottom of the screen.  This is a "toggle" key, so just tap the key again to turn this function off.
How do I create Headers and Footers?
View - Header/footer.  You'll notice I've inserted a footer in this document, including page numbers as we discussed.  Choose "insert page number" type a colon, then choose "insert number of pages" icon.
I want to put a bit of text beside a photo I have inserted. What is the best way to do this?
Either manipulate picture (as above), or insert a text box
Is there a way of adding words to Spellcheck?
Yes, highlight the word, click on ABC icon, add to dictionary
What is the % box for on the toolbar in the document?
This is a zoom feature to enable you to increase/decrease what you see on screen
Is there a quick way to change capital letters to lowercase and vice versa?
Yes, highlight the text, press the Shift key and F3
I've lost my ruler, how do I get it back?
From the View drop down menu, choose ruler and they will both appear again
I've received a document and each page is only broken by a black line.  How can I change this?
Choose Tools - Options and on the "View" tab, click in the "White space between pages"